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Architectural design firm Perkins&Will built a prototype of what seems to be a fully sustainable residence, a true ‘off-the-grid’ house that is self-sufficient and environment-friendly structurally, but also process-wise.

SoLo House, nestled in a remote forested knoll overlooking the Soo Valley in British Columbia’s Coast Mountains, looks to be the testing grounds for fully sustainable living. Dubbed as ‘a temple to Douglas Fir’, the dominant material is lightweight, readily available, and easy to mobilize and assemble — drastically reducing the carbon footprint in construction. A prefabricated and modular approach helps this cause as well, keeping all materials readily available for a quick build.

In line with its goal of full sustainability, the house employs a photovoltaic array, geo-exchange system, and hydrogen fuel cell as a backup energy source. Wind power structures complement solar generation, and water collection and wastewater processing systems result in the house producing more energy than it expends.

With a fully self-sufficient ecosystem under its roof, the house serves as template for what residences not only could be — but should be. Visit the other projects of Perkins&Will on their website and Instagram.

SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will
SoLo House Perkins&Will

Photography © Andrew Latreille for Perkins&Will

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