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Taking origami a step further, Vietnamese artist Hoang Tien Quyet uses a wet fold technique for his whimsical animal creations, resulting in a flowing form that skirts between paper art and sculpture.

Wetting the paper allows the material to be manipulated and shaped easily before returning to its rigid state, a technique invented in the 20th century by Akira Yoshizawa. Quyet’s fluid figurines of foxes, sheep, roosters and birds are more subdued than the usual angular origami forms, appearing softer and more vulnerable than usual. In his blog, Quyet mentions that he more often than not works on a trial and error process. “I always improvise them. I never know how the final results will be,” he says. “I just have a feeling and go for it, always leaving a space for freedom, and letting the paper surprise me.”

Visit his website for more of his work and tutorials. Follow him as well on Facebook and Instagram.

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Hoang Tien Quyet

Images © Hoang Tien Quyet / with permission

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