A tour of spectacular Soviet era bus stops

From London to St. Petersburg, photographer Christopher Herwig takes us on a tour of spectacular Soviet era bus stops. In 2002, he began a memory-defining project that would see him traverse 18,000 miles. At first, setting himself the challenge of taking one photograph every hour on his journey across fourteen countries, he began to notice the curiously designed bus stops that punctuated sparse roads in the former Soviet Union.

After some research into these local bus stops, it transpired that they had once been the vehicle for artistic experimentation in the Soviet period, during which the design restrictions were very relaxed. What Herwig discovered was a collection of varied styles which were unique to each region and are now compiled in a book entitled Soviet Bus Stops.

Lauded by Martin Parr as one of 2014’s best photobooks, it is the most accomplished and in depth compilation of Soviet bus stop designs to date, where its documentation details bus stops from Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Moldova, Armenia, the disputed region of Abkhazia, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Belarus and Estonia.

Herwig is an avid traveler whose voracious appetite for new experiences has motivated him to hitch-hike across some varied and distant lands. One was a stint from Vancouver to Cape Town where another saw him negotiate Iceland on foot and occasionally by raft. Employed by the likes of GEO, CNN Traveler, Geographical, and Lonely Planet, he has used these platforms to present the world with extraordinary travel photography from remote corners of the Earth, ranging from the Pamir mountains in Tajikistan to West African rainforests.

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Soviet Bus Stops is distributed globally through D.A.P. (USA and Canada) and Thames & Hudson (Europe and rest of the world).