In the series Colosses, photographer Fabrice Fouillet captures gigantic statues not for their artistic, ideological, political or religious representations, but for the perspective of their ridiculously large proportions against the landscape they are erected on.

Instead of cropping, fitting or framing the statues as one normally would, Fouillet shifts and widens his view to include the normal hustle and bustle of life happening around it. In some pictures, the icons stand against a horizon of trees, gas stations, streets and houses, looking more awkward than imposing. In others, Fouillet emphasises their disproportion by including human figures in the frame.

“I chose to photograph the statues from a standpoint outside their formal surroundings, and to favour a more detached view, watching them from the sidelines. This detachment enabled a wider view of the landscape and to place the monuments in a more contemporary dimension,” writes Fouillet.

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Amitabha Buddha in Ushiku, Japan, 110 m (360 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Grand Bouddha Sakayamunee in Ang Thong, Thailand, 92 m (301 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Grand Byakue in Takazaki, Japan, 42 m (137 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Mao Zedong in Changsha, China, 32 m (105 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Christ Blessing in Manado, Indonesia, 30 m (98.5 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

African Renaissance Monument in Dakar, Senegal, 49 m (161 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Jibo Kannon in Kagaonsen, Japan, 73 m (239 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Dai Kannon in Sendai, Japan, 100m (330 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Laykyun Setkyar in Monywa, Myanmar, 116 m (381 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

Alyosha Monument in Murmansk, Russia, 35.5 m (116.5 ft)

Fabrice Fouillet statues photography

The Motherland Call in Volgograd, Russia, 87 m (285 ft)