The series Abandoned States of Pablo Iglesias Maurer was inspired by a found matchbox featuring an idyllic photo of a Poconos resort complex in the 60s, which he visited out of curiosity and found abandoned. This set him on a quest to document the state of various buildings, edifices and structures so proudly printed on 1960s postcards (which he got from Ebay).

Aligning the two images together, he presents his intriguing work in before-and-after GIF animations that make you ponder how cruel time can be to the deserted. Some structures are still standing while others have changed after almost five decades.

Photos of abandonment tend to be a bit stylised, painting decay with a nostalgic brush,” says Maurer. “The postcards, too, have their own haze — the places were never as nice as they look.I often struggle to get the two images to line up, as well. But time blurs the difference, and brings everything into focus.”

See more examples of Abandoned States here.

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

The indoor pool at Grossinger’s, which opened in 1958. Elizabeth Taylor attended the pool’s opening, and Florence Chadwick – the first woman to swim the English Channel in both directions – took the first dip in it. From Ross Padluck’s excellent “Lost Architecture of Paradise”: “…The new indoor pool at Grossinger’s was the zenith of the Catskills. Nothing quite like it had ever been built, and nothing ever would be again. It represented everything about the Catskills in the 1950s-style: extravagance, luxury, modernism and celebrity.” (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Bill Bard Associates.)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

Grossinger’s indoor tennis center. The rear of the postcard is an ad for Grossinger’s rye bread, a local staple during the resort’s operation. Resort royalty Jenny Grossinger lays out the pitch: “The fun and fresh air people get here at Grossinger’s really gives them an appetite. They love all of our food – and a particular favorite is our Grossinger’s rye and pumpernickel bread. Now you can get this same healthy, flavorful bread at your local food store. Try a loaf. I’m sure you’ll love it.” (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by FPC advertising)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

The Homowack Lodge now sits abandoned on the southern edge of the famed “Borscht Belt.” On its lower level, maybe the highlight of the place, a four-lane Brunswick bowling alley. It has seen better days. The resort closed in the mid-2000’s but lived on briefly, first as a Hasidic resort and lastly as the site of a summer camp—one which was forced to shut down after the NY Department of Environmental Conservation deemed it uninhabitable. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Bill Bard Associates)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

The browns and reds and oranges of this Poconos dining hall’s carpet have turned green, the color of the moss that’s taken its place. Photo by (Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Kardmasters)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

Grossinger’s outdoor pool, olympic sized, built in 1949 at a cost of $400,000 (about $5 million in today’s market.) Long gone are the private cabanas, changing room and lounges that used to surround it. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard published by Bill Bard Associates)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

More of the indoor pool at Grossinger’s. The tiled floor was heated, the entire structure air conditioned. Above, beautiful mid-century “sputnik” chandeliers cast a glow on the swimmers below. Below the pool are exercise rooms, a gym, salon and a host of other amenities. The pool has sat vacant since the late 90’s and has fallen beyond repair. (Photo by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, historical photo published by Bill Bard Associates.)

Pablo Iglesias Maurer Abandoned States Photography

After a fire destroyed the main building at this resort in the Poconos, a replacement went up in the early 70’s. It is a truly striking sight, a modernist spaceship tucked away deep in the woods. (Photograph by Pablo Iglesias Maurer, postcard by Kardmasters)

Images and photo captions © Pablo Iglesias Maurer via dcist.com