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Architect couple Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes, who head their own eponymous architecture studio, completed their family home in Kvitfjell, Norway – a raised rectangular volume which they clad entirely in diagonally-arranged tree logs typically used by local farmers for building fences.

Dubbed Skigard Hytte, the dwelling is lifted from the ground on wooden columns like a sculptural monument, a simple yet striking presence amidst the surrounding forest. This not only gives the home a better vantage point over the landscape, but also leaves the ground it’s built upon relatively untouched; a conscious gesture that respects the grazing trails of local sheep and animals who occasionally take shelter beneath the home. 

Wood is prominently used throughout the construction and interiors, in line with the architects’ affinity for the material’s sensory qualities, as well as their desire to pay tribute to Norway’s architectural and cultural heritage. In addition to the exterior Skigard logs and its smooth pinewood interiors, the architects also applied wood to the smallest details of the home, from the cabinetry, bespoke furniture, bathroom surfaces, and even refrigerator handles. “We were able to explore things that we previously wanted to try but have not been able to do yet with a client,” the studio says. In all aspects, the Skigard Hytte is a passion project; a home that completely embodies its dwellers’ nature-loving sensibilities and minimalist aesthetic.

Check out More-Ulnes Architects’ website and Instagram, and browse more architectural projects coming from Norway here.

Mork Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte
Mork Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte
Mork-Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte
Mork-Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte
Mork-Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte
Mork-Ulnes Architects Skigard Hytte

Photography © Bruce DamonteJuan Benavides for Mork Ulnes Architects

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