7 Brilliant Student Product Designs Inspired By the Past

The Tomorrow Collective is a group of masters students from Lund University’s School of Industrial Design who have been “inspired by the past to enable living in the future”. As expected, the meeting of these bright young minds have produced versions of everyday objects that deliver sustainability and design in smart packages.

The inventive, forward-thinking designs weed out the excess and overthinking from products, effectively narrowing it down to its bare essentials. The result is a series of objects that focus on Growing, Making, and Being: taking modern tools and systems back to their traditional roots, allowing them to be reused and renewed, all the while exploring “ways of enabling us to live a sustainable life in the future”.

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Andrea Muller’s Micu encourages the consumer to make a smart choice when it comes to store-bought yoghurt: Instead of purchasing mass-produced yoghurt which come in plastic containers, you can make a healthier, sustainable version of it yourself in the comforts of your own home.

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Little Thumb by Elena Biondi gathers and saves the crumbs that fall from slicing bread, which is then stored in a jar for the next time you need bread crumbs for a recipe. You can also grate stale bread using the metal grater that comes with the product.

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Kreis-Lauf by Stephan Thiemt revives the cobbling tradition, providing you with the tools to create your own ecological, economical footwear.

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Why make your own toothpaste, you ask? Why not, asks Olof Janson in return. The Toothpaster urges on a growing movement of toothpaste mixing. The colorful containers and tools created by Janson reminds us that making toothpaste is but a simple process involving natural ingredients.

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Who wants candy? Tessa Geuze provides moulds, tools and storage necessary to create your own seasonal sweets to satisfy your cravings with Something Sweet.

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Eco Carrying by Jingyi Zhang reduces the use of plastic bags in the favor of this lightweight, modern grocery trolley, made of wood, rope and a canvas bag.

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The Wooden Iron by Ausrine Augustinaite is the version 1.0 of the hot iron. The tools made of wood are capable of smoothing your clothes down without plugging any device to a socket. That’s how they did it back in the day.

The rest of their projects can be seen here.